Tag: Quail & Wildlife Waterers

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The Ultimate Pursuit in Hunting: Sheep

Desert Bighorn Sheep are one of four wild sheep found in North America. All four are incredible animals. Few private landowners in far-West Texas have as much experience or success with Desert Bighorn Sheep as ourselves. Our experience is that sheep are easy to raise: Add lots of free water and leave them, and all

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Slideshow: Circle Ranch Wildlife, December 2016

There is not a federal or state park in far-West Texas where one can see free ranging elk, sheep, pronghorn and mule deer together. These animals and many others are found in abundance at Circle Ranch, because of our (1) water system, (2) periodic planned cattle grazing, (3) protection of predators, (4) protection of all

Circle Ranch - Giant Sacaton

If Monsanto Loses Its Name, What Will Opponents Oppose?

The Wall Street Journal remains in the hip pocket of the agrochemical giants. In the story below, the supposedly conservative news organization makes fun of those who worry about the poisons being poured on our farmland, because thanks to genetic modification, many of our crops are immune to the poisons that once killed them along

Circle Ranch Game Cameras – Mid Fall 2016

Do most of the species pictured below—and all of the predators—“compete” with each other and harm bighorn, mule deer, pronghorn and ecosystem health as the wildlife agencies say? Or do they complement each other? Is biodiversity good or bad for our deserts? Recent studies of the Serengeti shed light on this debate. They confirm that

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Public Wildlife on Private Land

The unification of wildlife management and private land management is essential for the wellbeing of both.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – Late Summer 2016

You are looking at the cheapest, fastest and most sustainable way to restore degraded desert grasslands: animal biodiversity. Why is this so? Because to be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) large, concentrated migratory bison herds or cattle grazed in a manner that mimics bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all

Plan to Spray Herbicides along the Rio Grande Alarming, Risky

Down river from Big Bend, here is what they think of the plan to spray cane: Following the December 6, 2016 post on this topic, I came across this article from March 2016 dealing with the reaction of communities on the lower Rio Grande to the proposed use of glyphosate, more commonly known by its

U.S. – Mexico Teamwork Where the Rio Grande Is but a Ribbon

The destructive and wasteful application of invasive species biology as promoted by The New York Times. Invasive species biology is based on the assumption that anything done by an “invasive” is by definition bad. According to the invasive species folks, cane is a sneaky invader that has driven out native plants and animals.

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Thanksgiving at Circle Ranch

Our best wishes go to you and yours this holiday season. Circle Ranch Thanksgiving – 2016 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – August 2016

The reason biodiversity is good not bad is because species are usually complimentary, not “competitive.” To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove