Tag: Pronghorn

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Video: Circle Ranch High Country

Pronghorn, Desert Bighorn Sheep and Golden Eagles in the high-desert mountains of far-West Texas. Circle Ranch High Country from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.   This video was shot, edited and scored by Jared and Tawny Zachary. They maintain our game cameras and guide. Jerad’s day job finds him in the Permian Basin oil fields.

U.S. – Mexico Teamwork Where the Rio Grande Is but a Ribbon

The destructive and wasteful application of invasive species biology as promoted by The New York Times. Invasive species biology is based on the assumption that anything done by an “invasive” is by definition bad. According to the invasive species folks, cane is a sneaky invader that has driven out native plants and animals.

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Thanksgiving at Circle Ranch

Our best wishes go to you and yours this holiday season. Circle Ranch Thanksgiving – 2016 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – August 2016

The reason biodiversity is good not bad is because species are usually complimentary, not “competitive.” To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove

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Early Summer 2016 – Game Cameras

Healthy ranges need: (1) Big nomadic grazers (bison or cows under planned grazing), (2) abundant predators and (3) lots of prey numbers and kinds. Take any one of these out and the system collapses.  The systems’ need for biodiversity is a physiological fact, not a social concept.   For 10-years in and around the Sierra

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Killing Bighorn to Save Bighorn?

It‘s hard to name a modern wildlife “management” practice that does not involve killing some plant or animal to “help” other plants or animals to the unintended detriment of all. The idea that humans can improve on nature would be laughable but for the damage being done to wild animals and their habitat by people

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Are GMOs Really That Bad?

Since humans began raising food by farming and keeping livestock, we have bred for better plants and animals. This is not and never has been the problem with GMOs; attempts to portray GMO opponents as nuts fighting better plants are a red herring. In classic bait-and switch, the agro-giants promised food and anti-trust regulators that

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Book Review: Woody Plants of the Big Bend and Trans-Pecos

This is a very useful book to the far-West Texas and Southern New Mexico landowner. Every landowner should try to know these plants by sight. Over 100 common trees, shrubs, cacti and other plants are identified and described. These are photographed as shrubs, in leaf detail, flower detail and seed development.

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Game Cameras – February 2016

In far-West Texas, a coalition of government agencies, agricultural universities and conservation organizations has decreed that on public lands more than half of the species pictured below should be severely reduced or removed altogether to help bighorn, pronghorn and deer. The coalition claims that all “exotics” and many “natives” including most predators “harm” favored species

Eyewitness Account of Pronghorn, Bison, Elk, & Mule Deer Sharing Desert Ranges

According to invasive species believers, including TPWD, bison and elk should be removed from our state parks and wildlife management areas because they don’t belong and because they “compete” with, and “harm” desert bighorn sheep and pronghorn.