Tag: Predator Removals

Circle Ranch - Sacaton

Study Shows Mountain Lions Pose no Human Threat in Big Bend National Park

Studies at Big Bend National Park show that mountain lions avoid humans, are most active early and late in the day, and that female lions are more active than males. This is consistent with our experience and observations at Circle Ranch, where we protect our lions because they and all other predators are necessary for

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Princeton University: Wildlife and Cows Can Be Partners Not Competitors in Food Search

Cattle and horses closely resemble native animals that would be the dominant large grazers in North America, but for human impact. Horses – these include donkeys or burros –  and their ancestors were in our deserts for 50 million years. They disappeared 5,000 years ago and have been back for 500 years. Cattle are close

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Slideshow: Circle Ranch Wildlife, December 2016

There is not a federal or state park in far-West Texas where one can see free ranging elk, sheep, pronghorn and mule deer together. These animals and many others are found in abundance at Circle Ranch, because of our (1) water system, (2) periodic planned cattle grazing, (3) protection of predators, (4) protection of all

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Screwworm Returns To The United States

The screwworm eradication program—a triumph of animal health science—came with unintended consequences. When the flesh-eating pest was eradicated and big predators were removed, deer numbers exploded. Now more than ever we need to protect deer predators for the health of the deer herds and their habitat, which cattle share with wildlife.

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Conserving the Legacy by Wyman Meizner

“The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.” …Aldo Leopold Securing The Legacy from Wyman Meinzer on Vimeo.

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Insect Armageddon: “The Fate of the World’s Insects Is Inseparable from Our Own”

Unless we adopt rangeland and agricultural practices that respect biodiversity and reduce or eliminate the use of pesticides and herbicides, we face catastrophic insect “declines (which) will cascade onto ecosystem functioning and human well-being.”

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Bears And Big Bend

Desert ranges cannot be healthy without a full compliment of predators, prey, and big grazers (bison or cattle).  Black Bears are necessary for the health of all animals and habitat. As with wolves at Yellowstone, bear will speed restorative ecology in the parks of far-West Texas. Note: This piece originally appeared in Texas Monthly online.  

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Feral Pig Toxicants in Texas

Free-range pigs, according to our wildlife and food quality experts, are unfit to eat because they carry diseases. But do they? Over the last 30 years, the two largest processors of wild pigs in Texas have slaughtered and tested tens of thousands of animals. They have never found a diseased pig (don’t confuse worms with

National Bison Day 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or cattle grazed in a manner that mimics bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the system collapses. Bison are gone, but the plants remain,

U.S. – Mexico Teamwork Where the Rio Grande Is but a Ribbon

The destructive and wasteful application of invasive species biology as promoted by The New York Times. Invasive species biology is based on the assumption that anything done by an “invasive” is by definition bad. According to the invasive species folks, cane is a sneaky invader that has driven out native plants and animals.