Tag: planned grazing

Allan Savory: How to Green the World’s Deserts and Reverse Climate Change

Desertification is a fancy word for land that is turning to desert,” begins Allan Savory in this quietly powerful talk (now viewed by 4-million). And terrifyingly, it’s happening to about two-thirds of the world’s grasslands, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos. Savory has devoted his life to stopping

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Grazing to Promote Riparian Health on a Private Ranch in Nevada

On this Nevada ranch, cattle numbers were tripled under planned grazing, with transformational results.

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Gulleys for Grassland Restoration #3

Eroded galleys can be used to restore desertifying grasslands – alongside creosote bush –  without chemicals. Third in a series filmed at Circle Ranch in far-West Texas.    

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Keyline 101: Desert Grassland Restoration

This 18-minute video explains how we use P.A. Yeomans’ Keyline concepts to improve water function at our family’s 32,000-acre Circle Ranch in the Chihuahuan high-desert grasslands of far-West Texas. The Keyline explanation is followed by a discussion of water harvesting and the role of drones.

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MDF / Lado Ranch Wildlife Water Project

In far-West Texas water additions like these are the very best, cheapest and quickest wildlife practice. Free water hurts nothing and helps everything.

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Plow and Tractor for Desert Grassland Keyline Subsoiling

What plow and tractor combination is most cost effective for restoring desert grassland with Keyline water practices? We call our method of desert grassland restoration Drought Busters. It combines: (1) subsoil plowing, (2) water harvesting from eroding gullies and roadbeds, (3) animal impact from holistic planned grazing of cattle, and (4) animal impact from a

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Princeton University: Wildlife and Cows Can Be Partners Not Competitors in Food Search

Cattle and horses closely resemble native animals that would be the dominant large grazers in North America, but for human impact. Horses – these include donkeys or burros –  and their ancestors were in our deserts for 50 million years. They disappeared 5,000 years ago and have been back for 500 years. Cattle are close

Dirt First

Agricultural practices are generally viewed as different from wildlife and habitat practices, whereas both should rest on the long-term objective of increasing soil fertility. The practices described below are similar to ours at Circle Ranch, as the photos illustrate. NOTE: This article was originally published by TheFern.org on April 21, 2016 A renegade soil scientist

Cowboys Turn to High-Tech Ear Tags to Monitor Animal Health

Small, inexpensive tracking devices embedded in ear tags that work through cellular towers instead of costly, heavy GPS devices would revolutionize grassland restoration. This would allow ranchers to track their stock on open ranges. Controlling theft, minimizing straying and limiting searches for missing animals would fundamentally improve grass-fed ranch economics. Returning large grazers to grassland

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Early Summer 2016 – Game Cameras

Healthy ranges need: (1) Big nomadic grazers (bison or cows under planned grazing), (2) abundant predators and (3) lots of prey numbers and kinds. Take any one of these out and the system collapses.  The systems’ need for biodiversity is a physiological fact, not a social concept.   For 10-years in and around the Sierra