Tag: planned grazing

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Plow and Tractor for Desert Grassland Keyline Subsoiling

What plow and tractor combination is most cost effective for restoring desert grassland with Keyline water practices? We call our method of desert grassland restoration Drought Busters. It combines: (1) subsoil plowing, (2) water harvesting from eroding gullies and roadbeds, (3) animal impact from holistic planned grazing of cattle, and (4) animal impact from a

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Princeton University: Wildlife and Cows Can Be Partners Not Competitors in Food Search

Cattle and horses closely resemble native animals that would be the dominant large grazers in North America, but for human impact. Horses – these include donkeys or burros –  and their ancestors were in our deserts for 50 million years. They disappeared 5,000 years ago and have been back for 500 years. Cattle are close

Dirt First

Agricultural practices are generally viewed as different from wildlife and habitat practices, whereas both should rest on the long-term objective of increasing soil fertility. The practices described below are similar to ours at Circle Ranch, as the photos illustrate. NOTE: This article was originally published by TheFern.org on April 21, 2016 A renegade soil scientist

Cowboys Turn to High-Tech Ear Tags to Monitor Animal Health

Small, inexpensive tracking devices embedded in ear tags that work through cellular towers instead of costly, heavy GPS devices would revolutionize grassland restoration. This would allow ranchers to track their stock on open ranges. Controlling theft, minimizing straying and limiting searches for missing animals would fundamentally improve grass-fed ranch economics. Returning large grazers to grassland

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Early Summer 2016 – Game Cameras

Healthy ranges need: (1) Big nomadic grazers (bison or cows under planned grazing), (2) abundant predators and (3) lots of prey numbers and kinds. Take any one of these out and the system collapses.  The systems’ need for biodiversity is a physiological fact, not a social concept.   For 10-years in and around the Sierra

Learning from Africa's Herbivores

These articles shed light on some of the basic insights of holistic management, planned grazing, and permaculture, as to the physiology of desert grasslands: Plants need animals as much as animals need plants. Many, many kinds of animals, from large to small, are necessary for healthy habitat. Restoration of animal biodiversity across the size scale

Plug and Spread Made Easy

This is a 4-1/2 minute video about the “Plug-and-Spread” method of harvesting water from gullies. Water harvesting including Plug and Spread, in combination with Keyline sub-soiling, wild animal impact and planned grazing of cattle are the cheapest, easiest and quickest way to restore water function to degraded desert grasslands.

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Cows and Elk – A Symbiotic Relationship

When grazed properly, cattle can be very beneficial for elk. Cattle are similar in their grazing impact to bison; bison and elk were mutually dependent for many thousands of years in North America. NOTE: originally published in HMI In Practice Newsletter May June 2013  

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In Australia, Cowboys Use Satellites to Home In on the Range

Technology is making holistic planned grazing cheaper and easier. NOTE: Post initially appeared on WSJ.com on January 24, 2016 Ranchers saddle up satellites to track herds; water-trough weigh-ins

Circle Ranch - Grazing the Impossible

Winter Grazing Report at Circle Ranch

Guy Glosson helps us with grazing planning and monitoring.  He is a rancher, HMI Certified Educator, and HMI Director.   Grazing Report, February 2015 I arrived late Tuesday afternoon and did not have time to look at much of the country. I went with David on Wednsday to feed the herd in the north pastures,