Tag: Multi-Paddock

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly moving cattle herds on rangeland health. Their peer-reviewed findings contradicted the earlier conclusions of other Texas A&M researchers David Briske

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Cows Can Save the World

I write to offer a constructive way forward in the tragic cultural genocide unfolding in America’s wonderful western ranching culture that is embedded in the nation’s culture. I do so knowing the risk of trying to help a lion by operating on a back molar in its jaw. …by Allan Savory

Creosote Bush: An Unassuming But Ancient Form of Life All Around Us

Though sometimes regarded as a nuisance by residents of the arid Southwest, the creosote bush is a complex and fascinating plant – and creosote colonies constitute some of the oldest organisms known to inhabit the planet. The shrub-like plant’s scientific name is Larrea tridentata, and it is known by many names, including greasewood, perhaps mostly

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Beyond Stockmanship At Rancho Las Damas, by Bob Kinford

The problem I was asked to solve is one of the reasons many cattlemen do not want to try holistic, planned grazing. During calving season the cows would leave their calves behind on the daily pasture changes, resulting in a loss of 15 to 20% of the calves. As it turned out, this was a

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Savory Institute: Holistic Management Research Portfolio

Allan Savory at Circle Ranch, June 2009   Almost every American wildlife agency, conservation organization, university, wildlife and range scientist is pledged to the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.  The Model lists its Core Principal #6 as: “6. Science Is the Proper Tool to Discharge Wildlife Policy

Multi-Paddock Grazing

Most range and wildlife scientists advise that the best way to graze, if one must graze, is “low-density set-stocking”: In plain English, a few cattle in the same place, all the time. For decades now, planned graziers have been showing that “grazing in nature’s image”: i.e., large numbers of animals, constantly moving, with extremely-long recovery