Tag: Multi-Paddock Grazing

How and Why Holistic Planned Grazing Can Restore Habitat and Ranch Income

  This paper, authored by Texas A&M range scientist Richard Teague and colleague Matt Barnes, discusses what has worked best for planned graziers across the world, and why conventional range studies have been unable to

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Emerging Land Use Practices Rapidly Increase Soil Organic Matter

“Emerging land uses, such as management-intensive grazing, may offer a rare win–win strategy combining profitable food production with rapid improvement of soil quality and short-term climate mitigation through soil carbon accumulation (sequestration)”

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Microbes Are the Key to Improving Rangeland Soil Fertility

David C. Johnson, Ph.D, of New Mexico State University discusses how his compost research shows tremendous promise for soil carbon sequestration, and the potential benefits that may have on climate change, our food system, rangelands

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Allan Savory: Planned Cattle Grazing Where the Rubber Hits the Road

In this 45-minute video, the Dean of holistic range science – Allan Savory – discusses on-the-ground application of holistic planned grazing. West Texas and New Mexico ranchers will find many helpful insights, observations and suggestions

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Rangeland Restoration: Subsoil Contour Plowing at Circle Ranch, in far-West Texas

Subsoil contour plowing is an excellent way to increase water absorption in the desert grasslands of far-West Texas and Southern New Mexico. The effectiveness of the practice is shown in these before-and-after comparisons.

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like

Dr. David Briske et al. Synthesis Paper

This paper was published in 2008. Texas A&M range scientist David Briske and several academic colleagues concluded that planned grazing is ineffective and has been disproved as a grazing method, and that low-density set-stocking, which

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To Fight Climate Change, Heal the Ground

Soil health and soil fertility should be the goal of every farmer and rancher. Imagine the changes in habitat and wildlife practices if every action and every inaction – such as using fertilizers and pesticides,

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Tanglehead in South Texas – Changes and Challenges

The so-called “invasion” of Tanglehead grass is a symptom of cattle removals on South Texas rangeland. This excellent article contains insights and facts that point to this. The facts: Tanglehead is a native grass. Tanglehead