Tag: “Invasion Biology”

sheep_on_the_mountain

Sheep on the Mountain

A great article from TWA. At Circle Ranch, we have enjoyed considerable success with Desert Bighorn. Here is our take on how to do this: Increase water. Add lots of free water everywhere. More locations

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Conserving Wild Bison: Finding Space for an American Icon

Conserving Wild Bison: Finding Space for an American Icon

Bison might seem to be an obvious addition to wildlife at Texas’ state and national parks, but there are problems to be overcome. Rick Wallen, lead biologist for Yellowstone’s bison program, explains the challenges and successes

cattle_habitat_restoration

The Most Powerful Tool

A very good article on using cattle to improve wildlife habitat.

Lyme Disease’s Worst Enemy? It Might Be Foxes

Outbreaks of epidemic diseases and parasites are growing wildlife problems, especially when these are passed to humans. Wildlife managers spend as much time on these problems as on any other aspect of wildlife husbandry. Predators

Pando, the Most Massive Organism on Earth, Is Shrinking

Pando—the Earth’s Most Massive Organism—Is Shrinking

Declining forests and rampant forest fires are symptoms of bad forest management. In the face of these escalating symptoms, politicians, bureaucrats and agencies offer their catch-all excuses — global “warming” and “invasive species.” To combat

west_texas_cotton

A&M Cotton Research Could Open New Front in War on Weeds

Hybridization of plants and animals is as old as agriculture and a good thing unless it attacks nature. Instead of producing modified plants that withstand weeds and parasites the international agrogiants like Monsanto/Bayer turned GMO’s

beavers_on_dam

Beavers, Rebooted

It is strange but true that as species disappear, the empty spaces they leave behind come to be accepted as ‘natural’. How many times during wildlife reintroductions has the objection been raised that deer, pronghorn,

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The Sounds of Elk Country Volume 5

The Sounds of Elk Country Volume 5

Another great video from Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation.

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McIntire-Beaver-Dam-Grand-Teton-NP

How Beavers Build Dams

For 20-million years, beavers have been nature’s water engineers. In North America – before Europeans trapped them out – 400-million beavers impounded 50-million surface acres of water. Beaver eradication was a disaster for continental hydrology.

beaver_IN_WATER

Building Riparian Resilience Through Beaver Restoration

As this article explains, every aspect of desert ranching and conservation of wildlife is enhanced by beavers.