Tag: habitat restoration

Planting Cereals in Desert Using Yeomans Plow

The idea of Keyline/Yeomans is to open soil to root growth by causing all water to soak in where it falls. The patterns hold water on the ridges and valley walls for this purpose. This

circle_keyline_rain_feature

Same Area in May Before 2010 Monsoons

This picture shows what winter moisture did for plants between the furrows.  Area to right in this picture was not subsoiled; obviously it received the same rainfall.

circle_ranch_keyline_1_feature

Our First Treatment With Yeomans Plow: October 2009

The first treatment with our Yeomans Plow.  Treating an area in which desert grass has shifted to tarbush (Flourensia cernua) and bare ground.

Christopher Gill to Editor of Big Bend Sentinel on Elk Removals by Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

I felt that several comments made by TPWD Executive Director, Carter Smith, defending elk removals, needed rebuttal. NOTE: The text of a letter to the editor appears in this post.  A PDF of the actual

circle_ranch_valentine_feature

Valentine Artist Boyd Elder Sets a Contour

All patterns are plowed on contours which are reset every 200 feet.  The device shown here is an optical transit.  We now use a laser transit which can be operated by one person and which

Plow Design. Timing of Treatments. Possible Seed.

This exchange should be read from the bottom up. It deals with various aspects of designing and using the Yeomans plow. The design of this plow can vary considerably as can its cost. Circle’s is

put-down-the-plough-circle-ranch-texas-1

Soil Resources

A group of leading soil, rangeland, bug and social scientists are setting out to fill the science gap.

Keyline Treatment of Headcuts

A central concept of Keyline-pattern subsoiling is plowing downwards in valley-forms and upwards on ridge-forms.  This discussion between Chris Gill and Ken Yeomans explains why.

Keyline Concepts for Subsoiling

Netting out what comes below, as explained in paragraphs 11-18: always plow valleys downwards and ridges upwards. This is the heart of Keyline subsoiling and the major unrecognized aspect of contouring which can actually cause

circle_ranch_west_texas_rain_feature

Flash Flood in 17 Draw, August 31, 2006

In the old West Texas joke, a visitor asks the old cowboy, “How much rain do you get a year?”  To which the old boy replies, “Only 11 inches, but you ought to be here