Tag: food-supply

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A Better Fight Against Cattle Fever Ticks

Planned grazing has been shown to significantly control fever ticks without medications when the recovery (rest) periods – the time between when a herd leaves a pasture and when it returns – exceeds 150 days.

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Farmers Across High Plains Brace for Hard Times as Drought Bears Down

On the Southern Great Plains dry spells are normal. Although farmers and ranchers can’t make it rain, they can keep soil healthy, to make the most of what rain they get. Any home gardener knows

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Farmland Birds in France Are in Steep Decline

Scientists involved in long-running regional and national bird-counting surveys in France have reported precipitous declines in agricultural regions, even among common birds such as blackbirds that are well adapted to human activity and do well

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Needed: A Safer Way to Fight Wildfire

Recently I was touring ranches near Ruidosa, New Mexico, and learned that toxic chemicals contained in fire-retardants like these had washed into their river systems, killing the fisheries which they are now trying to detoxify

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A New Study Suggests That Even The Toughest Pesticide Regulations Aren’t Nearly Tough Enough

“There were 1.6 million new cases of cancer last year, with 580,000 dying of the disease. Farm and industrial chemicals certainly play a major role in this epidemic. Yet little is done, with the poison-makers

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Greening the Chihuahuan Desert

Chihuahuan ranchers are at the forefront of restorative grazing practices. 

The Great Nutrient Collapse

Food nutrition is changing. This article blames atmospheric carbon, ignoring genetic modification of plants combined with the effect of the agricultural poisons our food plants have been engineered to survive. For example, a bushel of corn weighs

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Survival of Trans-Pecos Gambel’s Quail

The rapid disappearance of quail across North America, including the iconic Gambel’s Quail, is of great concern and merits study. Objectivity, though, is missing because the universities, agencies and conservation organizations that conduct the research

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A Gloomy Forecast for Climate Change

Planned grazing of cattle is an inexpensive and effective tool for restoring damaged grasslands, thereby helping habitat and wildlife. It also helps to reduce – and possibly reverse –  the atmospheric carbon accumulation discussed below.

Image By FORREST CAVALE

Soil Power! The Dirty Way to a Green Planet

“People reap more benefit from nature when they give up trying to vanquish it and instead see it clearly, as a demanding but indispensable ally. Because of carbon’s climate change connection, we’ve been conditioned to