Tag: Erosion Control

Creosote Bush: An Unassuming But Ancient Form of Life All Around Us

Though sometimes regarded as a nuisance by residents of the arid Southwest, the creosote bush is a complex and fascinating plant – and creosote colonies constitute some of the oldest organisms known to inhabit the

Creating A Flerd on the Circle Ranch

“Cowboy Bob” Kinford is working with us to combine all of our domestic longhorn, alpaca, llamas, horses and burros into a mixed flock/herd “flerd” as is done elsewhere around the world.  These animals will then

“Drought Busters” at Circle Ranch

These are pictures of areas that were holistic-planned grazed and sub-soiled on contour with a Yeomans Plow earlier this year. All of our subsoiled areas were first grazed then plowed on contour, using Keyline techniques

circle-ranch-texas-cattle-feature

Cows and Plows: Transformation Solutions

Commercial Farm Projects, Courses/Workshops, Land, Livestock, Rehabilitation, Soil Conservation, Water Harvesting — by Owen Hablutzel May 3, 2013

Circle Ranch - Pasture Cropping

Pasture Cropping: A Regenerative Solution from Down Under

This essay was originally published in Acres magazine. It also appeared onTheSolutionsJournal.com.  For more of Courtney White’s writing on conservation and agriculture see: www.awestthatworks.com.>   Author:  Courtney White   Since the late 1990s, Australian farmer Colin

Circle Ranch - Holistic Herding

Holistic Herding at Erosion Source

Often I have been told by planned-grazing skeptics that what we do at Circle with cows is only possible because of unique terrain features, expensive fence and water systems not available to others, and even

Circle Ranch - Sacaton

Sacaton, Cows and Fire

A characteristic of high-desert Southwestern grasslands are draws filled with Giant Sacaton (Sporoblus wrightii).  These majestic grass plants cover millions of acres in far-West Texas and New Mexico. At Circle we have several sacaton draws.  They

Circe Ranch - Grazing Giant Sacaton by "Cowboy Bob" Kinford

Grazing Giant Sacaton at Circle Ranch by “Cowboy Bob” Kinford

Normally sacaton grass is burned off and grazed early in the year as cattle “refuse” to eat it when it gets taller.  Just out of curiosity, I placed roughly half of the 420 cows into

Roads and Erosion: #3 of 3: Results of Treatments of Substandard Ranch Roads

Most old roadbeds are simply abandoned after they become impassible.  S.O.P. is to move over a vehicle-width, and start a new path.  When that wears out, do it again, and so forth.  Near Santa Fe,

Roads and Erosion #2 of 3: Addressing The Destructive Erosion of Substandard Ranch Roads

In the summer of 2007, Circle Ranch together with the Dixon Water Foundation, sponsored a road seminar at Circle Ranch. Attendees came from as far as the Navaho Nation in Arizona.  Bill Zeedyk, noted erosion