Tag: Cows

Desert Mule Deer “Management”: Does Culling Low-Point Desert Mule Deer Bucks Help or Harm the Herd and Its Genetics?

Culling Mule Deer – or whitetail – is scientifically unjustifiable, and does not improve herd genetics. Note: This post originally appeared on this blog in November 2014 Approach #1: Remove Cull Bucks to Improve Herd Genetics …Jerad Wayne Zachary, Deer Guide Dear Mr. Gill, I hope you are doing well. I just wanted to throw in

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly moving cattle herds on rangeland health. Their peer-reviewed findings contradicted the earlier conclusions of other Texas A&M researchers David Briske

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like getting a ranch (or two) for free. These results directly contradict the agency-university biases against cattle in general and holistic

animal_crossing_highway_montana

Wildlife Crossings Get a Whole New Look

These structures can satisfy wildlife’s need to move across our Western ranges. They can also facilitate grazing.  Both are needed for habitat restoration and wildlife conservation.

View Video
circle_ranch_keyline_plow

Keyline 101: Desert Grassland Restoration

This 18-minute video explains how we use P.A. Yeomans’ Keyline concepts to improve water function at our family’s 32,000-acre Circle Ranch in the Chihuahuan high-desert grasslands of far-West Texas. The Keyline explanation is followed by a discussion of water harvesting and the role of drones.

Circle Ranch - Mule Deer

TPWD Mule Deer Habitat Advice

I was surprised to learn at a TPWD mule deer seminar that the way we graze cattle at Circle Ranch harms plants and water function. So I read all the studies on which these conclusions were based and found they did not study what they claimed to study. I wrote this letter to the authors…

View Video
holistic_management

Holistic Management at Work

Holistic management uses a long term planning process that assigns to environmental and social outcomes the same importance as profits.  Its grazing and wildlife practices are particularly suited to the deserts of far-West Texas.

cattle_circle_ranch

Princeton University: Wildlife and Cows Can Be Partners Not Competitors in Food Search

Cattle and horses closely resemble native animals that would be the dominant large grazers in North America, but for human impact. Horses – these include donkeys or burros –  and their ancestors were in our deserts for 50 million years. They disappeared 5,000 years ago and have been back for 500 years. Cattle are close

circle_ranch_screwworm

Screwworm Returns To The United States

The screwworm eradication program—a triumph of animal health science—came with unintended consequences. When the flesh-eating pest was eradicated and big predators were removed, deer numbers exploded. Now more than ever we need to protect deer predators for the health of the deer herds and their habitat, which cattle share with wildlife.

circle_ranch_bighorn_feature

Circle Ranch Game Cameras – August 2016

The reason biodiversity is good not bad is because species are usually complimentary, not “competitive.” To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove