Tag: Conservation

Studies of Nomadic Grazers on the Serengeti

While there is a growing body of comparative research between holistic planned grazing vs. conventional grazing of domestic animals like cattle, goats and sheep, there is a relative-lack of information on how nomadic herds interact with intact wild grasslands.  This is logical: almost no wild grasslands are left to study! The article below summarizes two

Circle Ranch - Indian Cave

Circle Ranch Indian Cave

At Circle Ranch we have what may be the most important unexplored cave dwelling in far-West Texas:  A large cave which occurs in one of our limestone escarpments.  It is about 200-feet above the desert floor and 100 feet below the escarpment top.  The cave measures roughly 80’ by 80’.  Inside, it has a regular

Circle Ranch - Genuine Land Stewardship

Genuine Land Stewardship

Steve Nelle on Genuine Land Stewardship Reprinted in its entirety below is an excellent article by our friend, Steve Nelle, entitled Genuine Land Stewardship.  Steve is a range and wildlife scientist who has enjoyed a long and successful career in the National Resources Conservation Service.

TPWD Habitat Survey at Circle Ranch

In late fall of 2010 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department conducted a habitat survey at Circle Ranch, to see if our many cattle and other species including so called “exotics” were harming habitat through “competition”.  As confirmed by this report, TPWD biologists found the opposite to be true. It turns out that biodiversity and high

Roads and Erosion: #3 of 3: Results of Treatments of Substandard Ranch Roads

Most old roadbeds are simply abandoned after they become impassible.  S.O.P. is to move over a vehicle-width, and start a new path.  When that wears out, do it again, and so forth.  Near Santa Fe, there are places where the old Camino Real has thirty-five abandoned beds, side-by-side.  Abandoned roads continue to cut.  They must

Roads and Erosion #2 of 3: Addressing The Destructive Erosion of Substandard Ranch Roads

In the summer of 2007, Circle Ranch together with the Dixon Water Foundation, sponsored a road seminar at Circle Ranch. Attendees came from as far as the Navaho Nation in Arizona.  Bill Zeedyk, noted erosion expert from Albuquerque taught our class.

Roads and Erosion: #1 of 3

Pictured here is a typical gully. It was caused by a road which triggered an upward-moving headset. How can you tell an active gully? Whenever the sides of a gully are vertical, the gully is unstable. These drain pastures and ‘bleed’ moisure out of the water table on both sides. This dries soil and leads

Christopher Gill to Editor of Big Bend Sentinel on Elk Removals by Texas Parks and Wildlife Department

I felt that several comments made by TPWD Executive Director, Carter Smith, defending elk removals, needed rebuttal. NOTE: The text of a letter to the editor appears in this post.  A PDF of the actual article is also below in this post.