Tag: Burros

Wildlife in the High-Desert Mountains of Far-West Texas

Desert Mountain Wildlife #3 – part of a series on wildlife pictures was taken in Winter 2017, at Circle Ranch in the Sierra Diablo Mountains of far-West Texas. The series contains many wildlife photos, and, discusses holistic wildlife management practices. Desert Mountain Wildlife #3 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

Desert Bighorn, Mule Deer and Cougar in High Desert Mountains of Far-West Texas

Desert Mountain Wildlife #2 – part of a series on wildlife pictures was taken in Winter 2017, at Circle Ranch in the Sierra Diablo Mountains of far-West Texas. The series contains many wildlife photos, and, discusses holistic wildlife management practices. Desert Mountain Wildlife #2 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

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New York Today: Prospect Park Goes to the Goats

Even the folks in New York City have figured out that animal impact – in this case ‘exotic’ goats –  can better maintain open space than machinery or chemicals.  This insight puts them ahead of Texas’ mainstream wildlife ‘managers’.

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Circle Ranch Savory Institute Research

The Resistance to Holistic Wildlife Management

It is a sad fact that Texas’, agencies, universities, governmental and conservation organizations resist holistic wildlife and agricultural management practices. In this 5-minute video, range scientist Allan Savory discusses why this is so, and how this resistance might be overcome.

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Can Sheep Save the Planet?

“Desertification is a fancy word for land that is turning to desert,” states Allan Savory in his quiet but inspirational form. Desertification is happening to about two-thirds of the world’s grasslands, accelerating climate change and causing traditional grazing societies to descend into social chaos. Savory has devoted his life to stopping it. He now believes,

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Slideshow: Circle Ranch Wildlife, December 2016

There is not a federal or state park in far-West Texas where one can see free ranging elk, sheep, pronghorn and mule deer together. These animals and many others are found in abundance at Circle Ranch, because of our (1) water system, (2) periodic planned cattle grazing, (3) protection of predators, (4) protection of all

National Bison Day 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or cattle grazed in a manner that mimics bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the system collapses. Bison are gone, but the plants remain,

U.S. – Mexico Teamwork Where the Rio Grande Is but a Ribbon

The destructive and wasteful application of invasive species biology as promoted by The New York Times. Invasive species biology is based on the assumption that anything done by an “invasive” is by definition bad. According to the invasive species folks, cane is a sneaky invader that has driven out native plants and animals.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – July 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the systems collapse. Most wildlife ‘managers’ remove not one, not two, but

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Early Summer 2016 – Game Cameras

Healthy ranges need: (1) Big nomadic grazers (bison or cows under planned grazing), (2) abundant predators and (3) lots of prey numbers and kinds. Take any one of these out and the system collapses.  The systems’ need for biodiversity is a physiological fact, not a social concept.   For 10-years in and around the Sierra