Tag: Burro

View Video
burros_dig_wells_circle_ranch_feature

Wild Burros Providing Water for Wildlife

In far-West Texas, a coalition of government agencies, agricultural universities and conservation organizations has decided that wild burros on public lands should be eradicated. The coalition based its decision on the belief that what the burros are doing in the video below harms wildlife – especially Desert Bighon Sheep and Desert Mule Deer – and all

ircle_ranch_big_bend_fire_burros

Wildfire Danger Grows on Destocked Public Lands in Far-West Texas

When animals are removed, wildfire risk is increased. Cattle, burros, aoudad and elk will reduce this risk, and help deer, pronghorn and sheep in the process. NOTE: Post initially appeared on SAExpressNews.com on February 3, 2016 Big Bend National Park Still Burning Firefighters continue to battle a brush fire that began Monday in Big Bend

Circle Ranch Game Cameras: Using Biodiversity to Restore Desert Grasslands

Many wildlife “managers” try to eliminate most of the species pictured below to increase bighorn, or some other favored species like deer or pronghorn. Their actions harm the animals they intend to help because biodiversity is necessary for healthy wild animals and habitat. Until our practices are based on this insight, wildlife and habitat will

circle_ranch_west_texas_ram_feature

Animal and Plant Biodiversity Restoring Desert Habitats at Circle Ranch

A basic doctrine of wildlife “management” is that nature is under attack by thousands of “invasive” plant and animal species which “compete” with “natives” to “harm ecosystem health.” Analysis of the knowledge supporting this ideology exposes invasive species biology as pseudo-science: biological bigotry, dignified with empirically-hollow buzzwords. Efforts to eradicate these “invaders” are a boondoggle

circle_ranch_drough_busters

Drought Busters: Restoring Desertified Desert Grasslands

We call the combination of wild animals, planned grazing, water harvesting, and Keyline subsoiling “Drought Busters”. Drought Busters is cheap, fast, poisons no plants, kills no animals, and increases the numbers and diversity of both. Drought Busters can’t make it rain, but it will make actual rain more and more effective, which is practically the

circle-ranch-keyline-plow-feature

Restoring Desert Grasslands: Yeomans Keyline Subsoiling Results at the Circle Ranch, August 2014

Here is a cheap, fast, environmentally-friendly alternative to range poisoning with herbicides. When combined with holistic planned grazing of cattle, and a diverse population of wild animals, this practice leads to rapid conversion of subsoil to topsoil, increases soil fertility,  improves and restores water function, and, is sustainable.

View Video
circle_ranch_education_grades_f_feature

Bad News for Range and Wildlife Science: An “F” Grade for America’s Elite Colleges

American Council of Trustees and Alumni vice president of policy Michael Poliakoff on the state of the country’s most prestigious liberal arts colleges.

Aoudad, The Bogus Boogeyman

  Eradication Science or Eradication Snake Oil?   This piece asks common sense questions about the increasing use of wild animal eradication as a primary conservation tool, and about the foundations on which these practices rest: Why have eradications become so prevalent? Do eradications advance conservation? Are eradications based on science or snake oil packaged as

Circle Ranch Savory Institute Research

Savory Institute: Holistic Management Research Portfolio

Allan Savory at Circle Ranch, June 2009   Almost every American wildlife agency, conservation organization, university, wildlife and range scientist is pledged to the North American Model of Wildlife Conservation.  The Model lists its Core Principal #6 as: “6. Science Is the Proper Tool to Discharge Wildlife Policy

We and the Burro

About a year and a half ago I was contacted by Marjorie Farabee, President of the Burro Protection League.  Marjorie hesitantly asked me if I was aware that wild burros were being eradicated down at the Big Bend Ranch State Park: She thought I must support this, like most bighorn advocates.