Tag: Bighorn


Rancher Takes an Unconventional Path to Restoring His Land

“Chris Gill, 72,  together with his family own Circle Ranch in far-West Texas. He thinks of the desert habitat, its flora and fauna, as a single system.”

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Wild Burros Providing Water for Wildlife

In far-West Texas, a coalition of government agencies, agricultural universities and conservation organizations has decided that wild burros on public lands should be eradicated. The coalition based its decision on the belief that what the burros

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Mountain Lions of Far-West Texas

Much of what we used to ‘know’ about mountain lions turns out to be wrong, starting with the belief they are a threat to livestock or humans. Lions –  and all other predators –  are

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Texas Elk and the North American Wildlife Conservation Model

For 150-years American conservationists have followed the the North American Wildlife Conservation Model. It has been beneficial for waterfowl and iconic big game species across the continent with the exception of elk in far-West Texas.


These Hungry Goats Learned to Branch Out

At Circle Ranch we have also found that goats can be very useful as grazing tools to help maintain habitat for wildlife.

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Microbes Are the Key to Improving Rangeland Soil Fertility

David C. Johnson, Ph.D, of New Mexico State University discusses how his compost research shows tremendous promise for soil carbon sequestration, and the potential benefits that may have on climate change, our food system, rangelands

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Circle Ranch Wildlife Cameras – Summer 2017

Every month we review 5,000 pictures and post a few of the most interesting. What is pictured here is biodiversity. Multiple species are complimentary – not competitive. Ranges need keystone grazers like bison or cattle, lots of

Legislation Reclassifying Elk as ‘Exotic’

Here is the legislation that changed Texas’ native elk from treasured, protected game animals to vermin that are shot on sight at all state-managed lands in far-West Texas. The legislative declaration that elk are not

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Drought Busters 101

“Drought Busters” is an inexpensive, quick, physiologically and economically sustainable method of habitat and wildlife restoration. We call it Drought Busters because it increases effective rainfall by rebuilding soil fertility and the soil’s ability to


Wildlife Crossings Get a Whole New Look

These structures can satisfy wildlife’s need to move across our Western ranges. They can also facilitate grazing.  Both are needed for habitat restoration and wildlife conservation.