Tag: beavers

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Beavers, Rebooted

It is strange but true that as species disappear, the empty spaces they leave behind come to be accepted as ‘natural’. How many times during wildlife reintroductions has the objection been raised that deer, pronghorn,

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How Beavers Build Dams

For 20-million years, beavers have been nature’s water engineers. In North America – before Europeans trapped them out – 400-million beavers impounded 50-million surface acres of water. Beaver eradication was a disaster for continental hydrology.

Book Review… “Eager: The Surprising, Secret Life of Beavers and Why They Matter”

A reader remarks: “Ben has woven together a holistic picture about beavers, illustrating the remarkably diverse interactions between this species’ biology and the history of the North American landscape, both geologically and culturally.”

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Partnering With Beaver: Nature’s Hydrologists and Ecosystem Engineers

Utah State University researchers study beaver dams’ effects on habitat restoration and the possibility of utilizing beaver dams as an alternative to man-made dams. These practices will work in many parts of far-West Texas.

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Beavers in Arizona Deserts

Beavers are keystone species in desert ecosystems.

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Leave It to Beavers – The Atlantic

Quoting the authors below, “In the 1600s, as many as 400-million beavers were waddling about the continent. Just 6-million to 12-million remain today. You have to imagine that there was a beaver dam every half

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In Far-West Texas, an Artificial Beaver Dam Repairs a Desert Gully – and Reverses Erosion

 Artificial beaver dams are a recent addition to the desert restoration toolbox. Where trees have disappeared along stream-sides, beavers lack materials to build dams that can survive flood surges. But, if restoration managers provide

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An Artificial Beaver Dam to Restore an Eroded Stream Bed

Pataha Creek Beaver Dam Analog Timelapse from Snake River Salmon Recovery on Vimeo. You are looking at a downcut stream bed. Note the vertical bank at upper left: this means active downcutting continues. Due to

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Restoring Desert Watersheds with Beaver: Back to the Future

Beaver reintroductions can help restore damaged watersheds across the desert Southwest. In far-West Texas, the Rio Grande and its tributaries are obvious starting places. Yet, any ranch having a spring or a creek that flows

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West Texas Beaver Wetlands: The Historic Record

When European settlers arrived in North America in the 1500s, they found as many as 400 million beavers. These four-footed water engineers had created—and maintained—an estimated 50 million acres of beaver ponds. Beavers populated the