Tag: animal development

Bacon Preservative Tested as Feral Hog Poison

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Tests Wild Pig Poison Dispensers at Kerr Wildlife ‘Management’ Area NOTE: Post Originally appeared in San Antonio Express News on June 21, 2014 NEW ORLEANS — A preservative used to cure

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Actually Raising Beef Is Good for the Planet

Despite environmentalists’ worries, cattle don’t guzzle water or cause hunger—and can help fight climate change.

Planned Grazing and Keyline-Contour Subsoiling Restores Damaged Land at Circle Ranch, March 2009 – September 2013

In the southwest corner of Circle Ranch in the deep, steppe-shrub desert, we have a stock tank which we call “Lobo” because it was the last place that the Mexican wolf was seen in Hudspeth

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Beyond Stockmanship At Rancho Las Damas, by Bob Kinford

The problem I was asked to solve is one of the reasons many cattlemen do not want to try holistic, planned grazing. During calving season the cows would leave their calves behind on the daily

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Cows and Plows: Transformation Solutions

Commercial Farm Projects, Courses/Workshops, Land, Livestock, Rehabilitation, Soil Conservation, Water Harvesting — by Owen Hablutzel May 3, 2013

Texas Parks and Wildlife Department Blocks Private Turkey Reintroductions in Far-West Texas

January 17, 2013   Philip Dickerson Via email: phdickers@suddenlinkmail.com Texas Parks & Wildlife Dept. 4500 W. Illinois, Ste. 203 Midland, TX  79703 Dear Philip:  Thank you for your letter dated January 3, 2012 which arrived

Multi-Paddock Grazing

Most range and wildlife scientists advise that the best way to graze, if one must graze, is “low-density set-stocking”: In plain English, a few cattle in the same place, all the time. For decades now,

TPWD Habitat Survey at Circle Ranch

In late fall of 2010 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department conducted a habitat survey at Circle Ranch, to see if our many cattle and other species including so called “exotics” were harming habitat through “competition”.