Desert Mule Deer “Management”: Does Culling Low-Point Desert Mule Deer Bucks Help or Harm the Herd and Its Genetics?

Culling Mule Deer – or whitetail – is scientifically unjustifiable, and does not improve herd genetics. Note: This post originally appeared on this blog in November 2014 Approach #1: Remove Cull Bucks to Improve Herd Genetics

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Uninvited Vultures Coexist with Animals at San Antonio Zoo

These vultures are neither “invasive” nor “invaders.” They’re just wild animals filling empty niches created by human impact. It’s nature’s way—and they should be left alone.

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Rangeland Restoration: Subsoil Contour Plowing at Circle Ranch, in far-West Texas

Subsoil contour plowing is an excellent way to increase water absorption in the desert grasslands of far-West Texas and Southern New Mexico. The effectiveness of the practice is shown in these before-and-after comparisons.

Why Are Florida’s Orange Trees Dying?

  “It is not the overpowering invader we must fear, but the weakened condition of the victim.”             …William A. Albrecht (1888-1974), Ph.D., Chairman of the Department of Soils at

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California Condor Takes Flight in Wild After Near Extinction

The condor “once patrolled the sky from Mexico to British Columbia,” including far-West Texas. Perhaps someday soon they will again. While the majestic sight of a condor in flight makes it obvious why we should

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Gulleys for Grassland Restoration #12: Chupacabra Dam

Another example of a small dam that spills water from an eroded gulley, to reduce road washing and to irrigate a few acres of grassland at Circle Ranch in the high-desert mountains of far-West Texas.

Richard Teague et al. on Benefits of Planned Grazing

Here is peer reviewed, hard science from Texas A&M on the topic of holistic planned grazing. This paper by Texas A&M range scientists Richard Teague, Fred Provenza et al. studied the benefits of concentrated, rapidly

Rare Big Bend Grass Added to Federal Endangered Species List

Most agencies, universities and conservationists continue to blame cattle grazing for grassland decline. The biodiversity loss described in this article is real but the blame is misplaced. The real cause of grassland decline is lack

Ranches for Free: Birdwell Creek – Planned Grazing

  Here is a Texas example of high density planned grazing, which means the owners greatly increased cattle numbers and animal density, improving habitat and forage production. The increase in productivity per acre is like

Dr. David Briske et al. Synthesis Paper

This paper was published in 2008. Texas A&M range scientist David Briske and several academic colleagues concluded that planned grazing is ineffective and has been disproved as a grazing method, and that low-density set-stocking, which

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