Category: INVASION BIOLOGY

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Building Soil Fertility by Peter Byck

Physiologically there is no difference between public land and private land. What hurts or benefits one has the same effect on the other. Wildlife managers, whether we work on public or private land, must adopt restoration ecology if we hope to reverse the desertification of American Southwest’s grasslands. This 24-minute video discusses how to best

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Screwworm Returns To The United States

The screwworm eradication program—a triumph of animal health science—came with unintended consequences. When the flesh-eating pest was eradicated and big predators were removed, deer numbers exploded. Now more than ever we need to protect deer predators for the health of the deer herds and their habitat, which cattle share with wildlife.

Circle Ranch Game Cameras – Mid Fall 2016

Do most of the species pictured below—and all of the predators—“compete” with each other and harm bighorn, mule deer, pronghorn and ecosystem health as the wildlife agencies say? Or do they complement each other? Is biodiversity good or bad for our deserts? Recent studies of the Serengeti shed light on this debate. They confirm that

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Conserving the Legacy by Wyman Meizner

“The outstanding scientific discovery of the twentieth century is not television, or radio, but rather the complexity of the land organism. Only those who know the most about it can appreciate how little we know about it.” …Aldo Leopold Securing The Legacy from Wyman Meinzer on Vimeo.

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Book Review: Man, Cattle and Veld by Johann Zietsman

Man, Cattle and Veld by Johann Zeitsman records the journey of one of South Africa’s foremost cattleman from a practitioner of the disastrous range management methods of American and African universities to a practitioner of Allan Savory’s range management principles and, eventually, a pioneer of mob grazing. The book is divided into three parts, which

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Bears And Big Bend

Desert ranges cannot be healthy without a full compliment of predators, prey, and big grazers (bison or cattle).  Black Bears are necessary for the health of all animals and habitat. As with wolves at Yellowstone, bear will speed restorative ecology in the parks of far-West Texas. Note: This piece originally appeared in Texas Monthly online.  

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Feral Pig Toxicants in Texas

Free-range pigs, according to our wildlife and food quality experts, are unfit to eat because they carry diseases. But do they? Over the last 30 years, the two largest processors of wild pigs in Texas have slaughtered and tested tens of thousands of animals. They have never found a diseased pig (don’t confuse worms with

National Bison Day 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or cattle grazed in a manner that mimics bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the system collapses. Bison are gone, but the plants remain,

Prosthetic Found in Beaver Dam

Following on the earlier post (12/6/16) about how to best control cane on the Rio Grande, here is a piece that shows beavers will use almost anything to build dams. This includes cane and saltcedar. Recently I toured a beautiful ranch on the Purgatoire River in southeastern Colorado, owned by The Nature Conservancy (TNC). On

Plan to Spray Herbicides along the Rio Grande Alarming, Risky

Down river from Big Bend, here is what they think of the plan to spray cane: Following the December 6, 2016 post on this topic, I came across this article from March 2016 dealing with the reaction of communities on the lower Rio Grande to the proposed use of glyphosate, more commonly known by its