Category: HABITAT RESTORATION

Studies of Nomadic Grazers on the Serengeti

While there is a growing body of comparative research between holistic planned grazing vs. conventional grazing of domestic animals like cattle, goats and sheep, there is a relative-lack of information on how nomadic herds interact

Results of Planned Grazing on Ranges of Northern Rocky Mountains

Here is an interesting article, with supporting tables, that demonstrates the results of planned grazing on 43 ranches in the Northern Rocky Mountain states of Montana, Wyoming and Idaho Without exception, the managers of these

Grazing in Nature's Image

Planned grazing is both simple in concept, and one of the profound environmental insights of the 20th Century.  While the physiological explanation of why it works is pretty simple, applying these principals is a lot

Multi-Paddock Grazing

Most range and wildlife scientists advise that the best way to graze, if one must graze, is “low-density set-stocking”: In plain English, a few cattle in the same place, all the time. For decades now,

Circle Ranch - Genuine Land Stewardship

Genuine Land Stewardship

Steve Nelle on Genuine Land Stewardship Reprinted in its entirety below is an excellent article by our friend, Steve Nelle, entitled Genuine Land Stewardship.  Steve is a range and wildlife scientist who has enjoyed a long and

TPWD Habitat Survey at Circle Ranch

In late fall of 2010 Texas Parks and Wildlife Department conducted a habitat survey at Circle Ranch, to see if our many cattle and other species including so called “exotics” were harming habitat through “competition”.

Roads and Erosion: #3 of 3: Results of Treatments of Substandard Ranch Roads

Most old roadbeds are simply abandoned after they become impassible.  S.O.P. is to move over a vehicle-width, and start a new path.  When that wears out, do it again, and so forth.  Near Santa Fe,

Roads and Erosion #2 of 3: Addressing The Destructive Erosion of Substandard Ranch Roads

In the summer of 2007, Circle Ranch together with the Dixon Water Foundation, sponsored a road seminar at Circle Ranch. Attendees came from as far as the Navaho Nation in Arizona.  Bill Zeedyk, noted erosion

Roads and Erosion: #1 of 3

Pictured here is a typical gully. It was caused by a road which triggered an upward-moving headset. How can you tell an active gully? Whenever the sides of a gully are vertical, the gully is

Circle Ranch Keyline Contrast Photos: 9/4/10

Regarding our Yeomans Keylining progress, here are the latest photos with my comments: October 1, 2009.  Last summer was dry.  I chose this spot because we had bare ground and minimal grass respose to several