Category: HABITAT RESTORATION

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Wildlife Numbers Drop by Half Since 1970, Report Says

Biodiversity loss in our Southwestern deserts is part of a larger global trend. Wildlife “management” is making this worse. NOTE: Originally appeared on WSJ.com September 30, 2014: By GAUTAM NAIK Analysis by WWF and Others

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Game Videos Fall 2014

  These videos were taken at what we call Sheep Tank, a water point that overlooks one of our largest canyons. Many species share this water, with no visible conflict with each other, or harm

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Restoring Desert Grasslands. EARTH A New Wild – Episode 2 – Plains

EARTH: A New Wild takes a fresh look at humankind’s relationship to the planet’s wildest places and most fascinating species. Produced by National Geographic Studios in association with Passion Planet, the series is hosted by

Circle Ranch Habitat Restoration Crews at Work – August 2014

Every month we edit 5,000 game photos from 13 cameras across the Circle Ranch. We have many species, and large animal numbers, as these photos show. The idea that these animals “compete” or otherwise “harm”

Ecology and Conservation of the Prairie Dog Grassland Ecosystem of the Northern Chihuahua Desert, and Far-West Texas

Long considered pests, prairie dogs are in fact necessary to the health of desert grasslands and wildlife. The desert grasslands of the Janos region in northern Chihuahua are home of one of the largest surviving

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When Far-West Texas Was at the Bottom of the Sea

Circle Ranch is at upper-right in this photo taken from Guadalupe National Park. A hike to the “top of Texas,” the world’s most famous fossil reef, leads to a new sense of the sublime

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Restoring Desert Grasslands or Creating Desert Badlands?

For 60 years, this National Park Service land has been “protected” from cattle, unintentionally accelerating its desertification.   Here is a typical Big Wildlife program being pursued at Big Bend National Park to “protect” degrading

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Desert Grasslands Restoration: Time Can Be a Grazier’s Best Friend or Worst Enemy

Whether cattle are good or bad for grasslands depends on TIME    By Robert L. Kinkead, DVM, retired Originally published in Stockman Grass Farmer Photos and Video from Circle Ranch, Hudspeth County, far-West Texas

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Restoring Desert Grasslands: Circle Ranch Jardineros

When we use our Yeomans Keyline plow to subsoil and stimulate desert ranges and plants, we take pains not to plow through cholla cactus, armadillo bush, allthorn, sumac, mesquite, and other trees and shrubs. This

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Restoring Desert Grasslands: Thistle and the Yeomans Keyline Plow

Thistle, also known as the “Tumbling Tumbleweed” is an iconic Western plant.  Even though it is despised by many as an “invasive” “exotic”, it is probably the single best rescue plant for our declining desert