Category: ELK CRISIS

Circle Ranch - Sacaton

Study Shows Mountain Lions Pose no Human Threat in Big Bend National Park

Studies at Big Bend National Park show that mountain lions avoid humans, are most active early and late in the day, and that female lions are more active than males. This is consistent with our experience and observations at Circle Ranch, where we protect our lions because they and all other predators are necessary for

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Slideshow: Circle Ranch Wildlife, December 2016

There is not a federal or state park in far-West Texas where one can see free ranging elk, sheep, pronghorn and mule deer together. These animals and many others are found in abundance at Circle Ranch, because of our (1) water system, (2) periodic planned cattle grazing, (3) protection of predators, (4) protection of all

Attacking Aoudad on Behalf of Bighorn

The Borderlands Research Institute (BRI) and Texas Parks and Wildlife Department (TPWD) say aoudad harm desert mule deer, pronghorn and desert bighorn, and habitat, because they (1) eat plants, (2) drink water and (3) do well. In fact: Aoudad and Bighorn are Complimentary, not Competitive The articles below reflect the institutions’ longstanding but scientifically unproven

Circle Ranch Game Cameras – Mid Fall 2016

Do most of the species pictured below—and all of the predators—“compete” with each other and harm bighorn, mule deer, pronghorn and ecosystem health as the wildlife agencies say? Or do they complement each other? Is biodiversity good or bad for our deserts? Recent studies of the Serengeti shed light on this debate. They confirm that

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Public Wildlife on Private Land

The unification of wildlife management and private land management is essential for the wellbeing of both.

National Bison Day 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or cattle grazed in a manner that mimics bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the system collapses. Bison are gone, but the plants remain,

U.S. – Mexico Teamwork Where the Rio Grande Is but a Ribbon

The destructive and wasteful application of invasive species biology as promoted by The New York Times. Invasive species biology is based on the assumption that anything done by an “invasive” is by definition bad. According to the invasive species folks, cane is a sneaky invader that has driven out native plants and animals.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – August 2016

The reason biodiversity is good not bad is because species are usually complimentary, not “competitive.” To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – July 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the systems collapse. Most wildlife ‘managers’ remove not one, not two, but

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Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD) – America's Answer to Mad Cow Disease

Here is a useful body of early information on Chronic Wasting Disease (CWD). CWD’s history has been revised considerably in the last 15-years. NOTE: This post is taken verbatim from MadCow.org Mad deer, mad elk: sources, definitions, and diagnosis CWD Video Successful transmission of CWD to primate and goat State-by-state update on CWD: 27 Jan