Category: PHOTOS

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Thanksgiving at Circle Ranch

Our best wishes go to you and yours this holiday season. Circle Ranch Thanksgiving – 2016 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

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Circle Ranch Game Cameras – July 2016

To be healthy, desert ranges need three things: (1) Large, concentrated migratory bison herds, or, cattle grazed to mimic bison’s migratory patterns; (2) a lot of predators of all sizes; and, (3) a high, diverse population of prey species. Remove any of these and the systems collapse. Most wildlife ‘managers’ remove not one, not two, but

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Early Summer 2016 – Game Cameras

Healthy ranges need: (1) Big nomadic grazers (bison or cows under planned grazing), (2) abundant predators and (3) lots of prey numbers and kinds. Take any one of these out and the system collapses.  The systems’ need for biodiversity is a physiological fact, not a social concept.   For 10-years in and around the Sierra

Mid-Summer 2016 Game Cameras

Do most of the species pictured below—and all of the predators—“compete” with each other and harm bighorn, mule deer, pronghorn and ecosystem health as the wildlife agencies say? Or do they complement each other? Is biodiversity good or bad for our deserts? Recent studies of the Serengeti shed light on this debate. They confirm that

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Spring 2016 Game Cameras

Biodiversity is Good, not Bad Because plants need animals as much as animals need plants, a biodiverse plant community requires a biodiverse animal community. Conventional wildlife “management” and “conservation” theory says that most of the animals, and especially the predators pictured below harm “native” plants and animals, through “competition”, and should be reduced if not

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Game Cameras – Early Summer 2016

Update and photos from our guide and camera manager, Jerad: Hello Mr. Gill, Quite the lamb crop this year. I don’t remember seeing this many in years past. I have seen a couple of groups with 10 lambs and lots with 4-8 as seen in the pictures! Also thought this was interesting: I have seen

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Game Cameras – February 2016

In far-West Texas, a coalition of government agencies, agricultural universities and conservation organizations has decreed that on public lands more than half of the species pictured below should be severely reduced or removed altogether to help bighorn, pronghorn and deer. The coalition claims that all “exotics” and many “natives” including most predators “harm” favored species

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Winter 2016 Game Photos

A basic disagreement between Big Wildlife and holistic thinkers like Aldo Leopold is whether multiple species compete with each other or compliment each other. Another is whether predators like wolves, lions, coyotes & bobcats harm prey species, or, as Aldo Leopold observed, benefit them by getting rid of sick animals and keeping populations under control.

Circle Ranch Game Cameras – Winter 2015

Below you will see many wildlife photos showing our mixed species sharing range and water. Note the areas frequented by different species. Elk do well everywhere, particularly in the desert, which means elk are potential rescue species for empty deserts. Bulls would be worth $10,000 – $15,000 if allowed to reach maturity. Based on experience,

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Animal Impact Made Easy #2: Treating Deadspots and Headcuts with Cattle

It takes lots and lots of animals to restore desert grasslands. This 4-minute video is #2 in a series on “animal impact”. It shows how, at Circle Ranch in the high-desert mountains of far-West Texas, we are using cows to re-grow grass in dead-spots, and cattle trampling to control erosion. Animal Impact Made Easy #2