Category: CATTLE

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Restoring Grasslands with Planned Grazing: Soil Carbon Curious

Adaptive Multi-Paddock grazing (AMP grazing) is regenerating soils around the world, producing healthy grass-finished beef. But the science on AMP grazing is sparse, to say the least. Now, a group of leading soil, rangeland, bug and social scientists are setting out to fill the science gap. Led by Dr. Richard Teague of Texas A&M, and

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Animal Impact Made Easy #1

Join a  a “pasture walk” at Circle Ranch in far-West Texas to observe how we use cattle to restore grasslands in our high-desert mountains. Animal Impact Made Easy #1 from Christopher Gill on Vimeo.

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Wildfire Danger Grows on Destocked Public Lands in Far-West Texas

When animals are removed, wildfire risk is increased. Cattle, burros, aoudad and elk will reduce this risk, and help deer, pronghorn and sheep in the process. NOTE: Post initially appeared on SAExpressNews.com on February 3, 2016 Big Bend National Park Still Burning Firefighters continue to battle a brush fire that began Monday in Big Bend

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Is Feedlot Beef Bad for the Environment?

Although this debate contains statistical data that may be accurate, it is missing holistic thinking, including the fact that our grasslands are in decline as a result of animal removals. This fact has profound implications for our society. NOTE: post originally appeared on WSJ.com · July 12, 2015 Feedlots play a huge but controversial role

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The Grasslands: Nice to Visit, Critical to Save

Excellent videos from the Savory Center Project posted to IndieGogGo at: https://goo.gl/fWVzLY Help us save the grasslands, stop climate change, fight desertification, and end world poverty.

Biodiversity Helps High Desert Grasslands: Circle Ranch Game Cameras, Fall 2015.

Because plants need animals as much as animals need plants, a biodiverse plant community requires a biodiverse animal community. Conventional wildlife “management” and “conservation” theory is based on invasive species biology, which is an ideology not a science. Invasive species biology maintains that most of the animals, including the predators pictured below, harm “native” plants

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How Safe is Your Ground Beef?

Consumer Report’s research concludes that beef from feedlot-raised cattle was more likely to have bacteria overall, as well as bacteria that are resistant to antibiotics, than beef from sustainably-raised cattle. NOTE: post originally appeared on ConsumerReports.org September 4, 2015 If you don’t know how the ground beef you eat was raised, you may be putting

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FDA Panel Seeks Tougher Antibiotic Labels

Fluoroquinolones are antibiotics which are widely used in feeding of confined livestock, especially poultry. Much of these antibiotics survive processing and remain in our food. NOTE: Post Originally Appeared on WSJ.com on November 5, 2015 Mounting evidence of previously unknown, and sometimes permanent, side effects prompted review.

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Bison, Cattle, and the Shortgrass Prairie of West Texas and New Mexico

Cattle herds managed under “holistic planned grazing” can replace the animal impact of missing bison herds. As explained below, grazing by large animals is necessary for grassland health. NOTE: article originally appeared in the Hudspeth County Herald on November 6th, 2015 Though the American bison, or buffalo, is now a national icon, in the 1870s

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Drought Busters 101 : A 21-Minute Video on Desert Grassland Restoration

“Drought Busters” is an inexpensive, quick, physiologically and economically sustainable method of habitat and wildlife restoration. We call it Drought Busters because it increases effective rainfall by rebuilding soil fertility and the soil’s ability to absorb and store water. This 21-minute video explains Drought Busters, and our experience on how wild and domestic animals, Keyline