All posts by Chris Gill

Ranching, wildlife management, finance, oil & gas, real estate development and management.

Leave It to Beavers

Beavers are still found in Rio Grande tributaries including the Devils and Pecos rivers. Friends of wildlife in far-West Texas should encourage their reintroduction in the narco-infested lower Juarez Valley, between Juarez and Ojinaga. In

In the Bones of a Buried Child, Signs of a Massive Human Migration to the Americas

  “Most likely, people were in Alaska by 20,000 years ago, at least,” say the scientists conducting the study reviewed below. This conclusion contradicts the accepted view that humans arrived in North America around 10,000

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Greening the Chihuahuan Desert

Chihuahuan ranchers are at the forefront of restorative grazing practices. 

The Great Nutrient Collapse

Food nutrition is changing. This article blames atmospheric carbon, ignoring genetic modification of plants combined with the effect of the agricultural poisons our food plants have been engineered to survive. For example, a bushel of corn weighs

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Survival of Trans-Pecos Gambel’s Quail

The rapid disappearance of quail across North America, including the iconic Gambel’s Quail, is of great concern and merits study. Objectivity, though, is missing because the universities, agencies and conservation organizations that conduct the research

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The Hard Truth About the West’s Wild Horse Problem

Horses belong in the Desert Southwest where they and their ancestors co-evolved with wildlife and plants over millions of years. With that said, though, we have a problem. Removing large nomadic grazers as well as

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A Gloomy Forecast for Climate Change

Planned grazing of cattle is an inexpensive and effective tool for restoring damaged grasslands, thereby helping habitat and wildlife. It also helps to reduce – and possibly reverse –  the atmospheric carbon accumulation discussed below.

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Mexican Grey Wolves Reintroduced

For almost 20 years, controversy has followed the Mexican Grey wolves as they’ve struggled to survive their reintroduction in Eastern Arizona and Western New Mexico.

Image By FORREST CAVALE

Soil Power! The Dirty Way to a Green Planet

“People reap more benefit from nature when they give up trying to vanquish it and instead see it clearly, as a demanding but indispensable ally. Because of carbon’s climate change connection, we’ve been conditioned to

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Jaguars Return to Southern Arizona

In Southern Arizona, the top predator is the mountain lion, but over the last 15 years, solitary male jaguars, typically one at any given time, have migrated from Northern Mexico into Southern Arizona and New